GANGS


BIRMINGHAM Police & Schools Panels

GANGS (Including County Lines) Resources & Signposting

A gang could simply be a group of friends that all like doing the same things. The word takes on a new meaning when a group of friends gets involved in criminal activity.

Although it is not illegal to be a member of a gang much of the activity that criminal street gangs get caught up in is. If caught committing an offence they could end up with a longer sentence just for being part of a gang. There are many different and complex reasons as to why people join gangs. It could be for status, to feel a sense of belonging, to make money, to earn respect, for protection from other gangs or due to exploitation by an Organised Crime Group (OCG).


County Lines: Many street gangs are involved with the supply of drugs. This can be a way that gangs make money. Dealing in drugs, like running a business has many different roles and levels of people controlling the entire operation. County lines (also known as ‘going country’) is a tactic used by individuals, or more commonly by OCGs to establish a drug dealing operation in an area outside of their usual localities. This typically involves gangs moving their operations from large urban cities out into more remote rural areas – particularly coastal towns, market towns, or commuter towns close to large cities.

Fearless.org: Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week - 365 days a year, Fearless.org provide information on the individual crime types (Gangs/ Where possible, we have included relevant supporting video and signposted to other agencies who are industry experts. Use the Order Form to acces the latest Fearless educational tools and resources.

You & Co:  Victim Support’s Youth Programme that helps young people cope with the impact and effects of crime. You do not have to report the crime to the police to get support from them.

The BeLeave Service: A new Spurgeons project working with 8-18 year olds, supporting girls to make positive choices and avoid gang-related harm. early intervention project uses whole family approach. We aim to build a network of support and establish positive activities for young people as an alternative to anti-social behaviour and exploitation by gangs. The project is part of an international learning project, Girls in Gangs, pioneered and funded by Comic Relief.

The Children's Society - Disrupting Exploitation Programme: The Disrupting Exploitation Programme in Birmingham is focusing on young people at risk of Child Criminal Exploitation (CCE).  They are currently accepting referrals for one to one support and advocacy to the young person, as well as prevention work.  They are particularly focused on children aged 13 -18.


For further information or to make a referral to this programme contact: shauna.breen@childrenssociety.org.uk


GUNS & KNIVES TAKE LIVES / PRECIOUS LIVES


The overall objective of the programme is to de-glamorise guns, knives and gangs in society and present the real dangers faced by young people if they choose to carry a weapon or associate with a gang. By giving students accurate and honest information, it allows them to weigh up the options, identify the risks and consequences and make informed choices.


PC Rob Pedley still has capacity to take bookings for this assembly input:


T: 101      Ext. 7630 6348   

E:. r.pedley@west‐midlands.pnn.police.uk

IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT MEDIA SHARED ON THIS PAGE IS VIEWED IN ITS ENTIRETY PRIOR TO SHARING WITH CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE

THE STRUGGLE


A London Fixer is challenging what she feels are the misconceptions surrounding the 'type' of people that become mixed up in gangs.


Temi Mwale, 18, from Barnet has helped create this film to shed light on the issue, and prevent young people from getting caught up in gang culture.